Confidence

Confidence

Acting teaches kids to take command in any situation. It teaches them to have confidence and to learn from their mistakes through practice. Actor’s training changes how you deal with nervousness in everyday life. Once you’ve taken the leap into acting and you’re used to doing completely ridiculous things (on purpose) in front of strangers, you’d be surprised how relaxed you feel before important meetings and interviews. Activities that may have once seemed stressful become comfortable and manageable.

Public Speaking

Public Speaking

Acting helps them to speak with sincerity and conviction. In the classroom, teachers often stress content above context, body language, and delivery, and students have few opportunities to practice public speaking and presentation. While what you say is important, how you say things is often just as crucial, if not more so. People often lack confidence, polish, and consistency. Public speaking requires a set of muscles that need to be worked and regularly maintained. Many adults live in fear of being asked to speak before a group, but the importance of this skill in nearly any career suggests students should spend time developing a certain level of comfort with it.

Creativity

Creativity

Children learn how to think creatively through role-playing. Some people call it out-of-the-box thinking, and it’s a skill that comes in handy as a working adult.

Focus

Focus

Having to listen and contribute during a scene helps to develop key focus skills. Acting kids to build greater concentration and keep their minds on the current task.

Accountability

Accountability

Kids learn how important their role is to a group activity. If they are late with their lines or don’t prepare at all, it affects the overall outcome.

Communication

Communication

In order to communicate effectively — active listening is integral. Acting class requires that students learn how to listen. Hearing is very different than listening. We hear a noise, voices, and music, but listening requires us to process and respond (rather than react). Our reactions are often driven by an agenda; what we say back to someone, regardless of what she has said or asked, may not depend very closely upon her words. Often, we’re more interested in planning what we’re going to say and in saying it than in responding earnestly in the moment to someone else. Acting also teaches nonverbal communication, body language. Kids learn how to show their emotions through body language and how others interpret different movements.

Criticism

Criticism

Children learn that feedback is just another part of the learning process, not something that should be taken personally.

Determination

Determination

With consistent practice and determination, kids get a feeling of accomplishment after a performance. Developing determination at a young age helps them reach their goals in the future.

Teamwork

Teamwork

Take a group of people, any people, and put them together in a situation in which they’re vulnerable and working together toward a common goal. They will form strong bonds. Students will, in a very short period of time, connect with one another — no matter what their surface-level differences are.